Traveling to Alaska and through the Yukon. Travel log with Charlie and Sue

Ready to head to the north
Ready to head to the north

 

Travel logs are always somewhat boring and lengthy, and so I included lots of pictures below.  Sorry this took so long to post but the first attempt went into cyberspace.
Day 1: We left home in Hampshire County, WV on Thursday and traveled to Arlington Virginia to stay with Sue’s cousin and husband.
Day 2: Ed drove us to Dullas International Airport at 5:30 am. We boarded our plane before 8:00 am and soon were in the air on our way on a five-hour flight to Seattle, Washington, arriving at about 10:00 am after traveling through three time zones. I had arranged for a rental car in Seattle so we gathered our luggage and ventured down to the rental area. In Seattle the car rentals are off the airport grounds so we boarded a bus and were shuttled to it. We picked up our little tiny, low-cost rental car which we found on HOTWIRE and ventured off  to see Seattle. then we loaded up the Garmin with some Seattle points of interest and took off. Our first visit was Pikes Place Market, an incredible flea market/farmers market/noveltie stores area of town. While drifting around, we found a nice place to eat overlooking the crowds at the market. After eating, we got back in our car and headed in the direction of the Space Needle. Finding a parking place was very interesting. Then we found out that the elevator ride up the Needle was $23 per person for a 15 story elevator ride! We decided that it was a little expensive for our blood so we walked around that area which is rich in culture with lots of interesting places to see. Overall, it was a great evening. With the sun beginning to settle, we set our sites on our hotel, the Quality Inn and Suite in Tacoma to get a good night’s sleep.

Day 3, 4, 5 & 6: We boarded the airport shuttle and ended up back at the airport to meet our charter bus and begin our journey to Vancouver. After a fun time at the Canadian border, (a bit of sarcasm) our driver took us to through Vancouver (there is no way around Vancouver) on our way to the boarding dock where we checked in with Holland Tours and boarded our ship, the Zuiderdam.

This is the sister ship to ours
This is the sister ship to ours

alaska-beach 2014 149
That evening we explored our boat searching out all the many areas including food areas, entertainment and a good place to watch the ocean and hopefully glaciers and whales. Well, after the first day, the fog and general yucky weather kept us from seeing glaciers or anything else while on the boat. After traveling two days through some rough water our large boat slowly settled into Juneau, the capital of Alaska. We had scheduled a tour to the Mendenhall Glacier, along with a whale-watching boat trip. The first leg of our trip took us to the foot of this immense amazing glacier, after which we headed over to the dock to board our charter boat to go whale watching.

The Mendenhall Glacier
The Mendenhall Glacier
Lets go see some whales!
Lets go see some whales!

We saw a number of whales but nothing like ones you see on the nature channel. When we returned from the whale watch, we were dropped off in the middle of town. I think Juneau has more jewelry stores than street corners. Sue and I walked the streets, checking out the expensive diamonds and gold and then returned to the ship for a trip to the bistro. Later that night our boat continued north to Skagway. The Eskimos have an alternate spelling, Skaguay, which I think means stupid white people.

The little town of Skagway
The little town of Skagway

Arriving in Skagway, we disembarked to find our way to the White Pass and Yukon Railroad which would then take us part way to Whitehorse, Canada. After a two-hour trip through incredibly beautiful mountains, we left to train and boarded a Holland Line coach for the remainder of our trip to Whitehorse.

Getting ready to head inland
Getting ready to head inland
Did not feel good about this....
Did not feel good about this….

We settled into the Whitehorse Westmark Hotel to prepared to explore the town. That evening we attended a local production called the FRANTIC FOLLIES which was extremely humorous! Whitehorse is a beautiful town but still a little tarnished by the influx of tourists and jewelry stores. That’s where we had our first run-in with Alaskan daylight hours. While walking around we decided to check out a book store. Whoa! How could it be closed? We checked the posted hours and it didn’t close until 9:00pm. Were we surprised to check the bank clock to find out that it was after 10:00 and still light!!
Day 7: We boarded our coach to begin our 8 hour journey on the Klondike Highway to Dawson, a major city in the gold rush. The ride was tolerable with frequent stops and plenty of scenery. Making friends as we go too.

A Lupine along the road
A Lupine along the road

We actually saw a Lynx, which is apparently very rare. Seems they are shy.

What are you guys looking at?
What are you guys looking at?

That evening we explored the little town of Dawson with its dirt streets, board walks and beautiful river frontage with an authentic river boat. We decided Dawson was our favorite town in Alaska. Due to the early construction and disregard for the permafrost, some of the early buildings were actually sinking into the ground. We would have spent more time in Dawson if we could have.

The incredible sinking town!
The incredible sinking town!

Day 8: We took a bus for a short trip to the airport, a gravel runway between two mountains, and boarded a 737 for very quick flight to Fairbanks. Just to make sure you did not miss that: a 737 on a gravel runway in the middle of mountains!  This jet jet is capable of carrying 120 people, but in our case, it was only allowed to carry 60 due to the short gravel runway and mountains! As we made our way into the plane, everyone sat on the right side to have a better view of Mt. Denali (formerly Mt. McKinley). Well, the stewardess decided that it was not a good idea to have everyone on the same side of the plane so some of us were asked to move to the left side to balance the weight. I thought this was a great idea! By the way, we are in the 30% of lucky people to see Mt McKinley while in Alaska!

I think I can....I think I can....
I think I can….I think I can….

Despite my concerns with the short gravel runway, surrounding mountains and light load, everything went fine. After landing in Fairbanks, we  soon settled into our hotel and took off to explore the town. That evening we traveled by coach for a short time to see the Alaskan pipe line, an old gold dredging site where we actually panned for gold!

Alaska's economic life-line
Alaska’s economic life-line
This guy could put a mark on the earth!
This guy could put a mark on the earth!
This is one tooth out of one of these monster dredgers!
This is one tooth out of one of these monster dredgers!

Sue panned out almost $27 in gold but I found a mere $14 worth which fell from my pocket on the bus back to the hotel.

What do you mean we have to leave?
What do you mean we have to leave?
I always knew she was a gold digger.
I always knew she was a gold digger.

For lunch we visited the nostalgic Soapy Smith’s restaurant for a great lunch and then journeyed onto the streets to visit the many gift shops. That evening we boarded a bus for a salmon bake-which is a local attraction where you pay a price to get in and then eat as much salmon and steak as you can before your stomach says UNCLE!  We met our new friends Gerry and Lynn from Australia. The four of us had a great time! They have invited us to come and visit them in Australia! ( I told Gerry to look for us January of 2016!).  We email each other so it looks very promising at this point! After the dinner we attended another humorous rendition of times in the goldrush era, very funny and entertaining!
Day 9: We boarded another bus to began the long ride through Denali National Park. During the 8 hour bus ride, we saw a grizzly bear, lots of caribou, mountain goats (actually called Dall sheep), a couple cow (female) moose and the Alaskan state bird, a willow ptarmigan, which I thought was sort of dorky looking. We were told it was a successful trip by out tour guide, but my butt was aching from sitting so long. That night we settled in early to prepare for our 8 hour scenic train trip to Anchorage, Al.  Here are some pics of the wild life we  saw in the park.

Wow, its a caribou!
Wow, its a caribou!
And a mountain goat...
And a Dall sheep…

Day 10: We boarded the McKinley Explorer and began our long scenic train ride to Anchorage.

On our way to Anchorage
On our way to Anchorage

This train is designed for passengers to see the terrain, with its big windows and elevated seating. On the other hand it is not very fast and barely gets over 30 miles an hour. It has to share the tracks with other trains too. When we arrived in Anchorage, we met up with Sue’s cousin and her husband who live in Alaska to joined them for a wonderful dinner.
Day 11: We were shuttled to the Anchorage airport and flew back to Seattle. That evening we boarded the local transit train to returned to Seattle to see some sights. We found a tour of the Underground City which was incredibly funny and educational.  About a hundred ago Seattle was a very dirty town. Following a big fire that destroyed most of the town, the town fathers decided to fill in the underground and start again on the upper level of buildings that survived.

Part of the underground city in Seattle.  I guess you had to be there....
Part of the underground city in Seattle. I guess you had to be there….

After the tour we returned to our hotel and relaxed for the evening.
Day 12: A quick trip to the airport, and we were on our way back to the east coast. We were ready to be home. Ed picked us up at the airport and took us to his home where we settled into a comfortable bed and quickly fell asleep.
Day 13: After a relaxing morning we loaded up the Honda to begin the last leg of our journey to our home in wild, wonderful West Virginia.
The Canadian Yukon and Alaska are incredibly beautiful areas, but Sue and I visited them in the warmth of an almost continual summer sun. I dare say, we have not seen its true colors when winter shows its mighty force. The few true Alaskans we met were genuine, sincere people who loved the area for its independence and natural grace. Although I thoroughly enjoyed this majestic wonder of nature, I think we will continue to head south when it is cold to leave the epic winters to the rugged folks of Alaska.